Financial Independence – Lessons Learnt Over the Past Year

two blue chairs on the beach
You might be able to sit here every day if you achieve financial independence

It has been over a year since I discovered the financial independence/retire early movement. I have listened to so many podcasts and read hundreds of blog posts in that time. It has helped me to become familiar with many of the principles of FI/RE and for those of you new to this concept I want to introduce you to the basic tenets. This is also an opportunity for me to look back at what I have learnt over the past year and how far I have come in my FI/RE journey.

The four percent rule

Financial independence is achieved when you have saved 25x your annual spending. For example, if you could live on £10,000 a year you only need £250,000 saved. If you prefer a less frugal ‘retirement’, say on £30,000 a year, then you will need £750,000. This is based on the premise that when you stop working for money you will be able to withdraw 4% of your savings every year to live on. Despite the regular withdrawals, at a rate of only 4%, if invested wisely, your nest egg should last until you die.

Although financial independence is amazing, I arrived late to the party, so my chances of being able to save 25x my spending are about zero. Nevertheless, the principles of FI/RE have enabled me to begin to spend my money more thoughtfully and helped me learn what is important in my life.

a takeaway coffee
Not buying one of these every day can add up

Small savings can add up

This is the easy part and something that everyone can do. Unless you’re completely new to the FI/RE movement, then you will already be familiar with the usual list of things to cut out of your life e.g. cable/satellite television, gym membership, daily lattes/lunches expensive mobile phones, bottled water.

I have stopped buying so many coffees and lunches, but also cancelled some magazine subscriptions. I have also not bought any clothes in a year, having realised that I have plenty to keep me going for a while yet.

The three big wins are making savings on housing, transportation and food

These are the three areas where we all spend the majority of our money. Over the past year I have mostly been tackling our food budget. We used to do our weekly shop in Waitrose, which is one of the most expensive supermarkets in the UK. I have to admit that the quality of some of their food is better than what I now get in Tesco, but currently the savings are worth it.

woman buying bread in a market
I have worked hard on making this stress-free

Food

As well as changing where we shop I have also devoted time to meal planning and now do that once a month, along with ordering a monthly food delivery. This is one of the areas where I realised that time is more precious than money. At the beginning of 2019 I was going to two separate supermarkets each week to maximize our savings, but after a long day at work I was exhausted and found this a challenge. I was also disappointed in the quality of the fruit and veg from Lidl and we ended up wasting food as it just went straight into the compost.

Now I choose to shop only at Tesco, which is via our delivery and then weekly top ups, mainly of perishables. The delivery also means that I am not lugging heavy bags of shopping in and out of the car e.g. beer, tins, bottles of cleaning products. I feel that I have completely taken the stress out of shopping. The delivery does come with a charge of approximately £1.50, but for me it is so worth it.

white house with blue shutters
Our house is really too big for just a couple, but we don’t want to sell it

Housing

Housing is a much more difficult area as prior to discovering financial independence we spent £435,000 on a house, albeit the mortgage was only £130,000. It now stands at £73,810.70.

I don’t want to sell the house and so the only other option is to maximise our asset. This could be through AirBnB or renting out a room. The first would be my preference, but I have realise that this may be difficult when we are hosting trainee guide dogs. We love having the dogs and wouldn’t want to give this up, but I’m not sure how the organisation would feel about this. Theoretically the strangers staying in your house could steal the dog, who is worth a lot of money due to all the training hours that has been put into him/her. This eventuality seems unlikely, but it would make me anxious. I am not sure how we are going to address this and probably need to have a chat with someone from the agency.

We are then left with the option of renting out a room on a long-term basis.  At the moment I am not sure about that. Mr Simple has talked about trying to find full-time employment, which may mean staying away from home Monday to Friday. If that does happen I may consider having lodger, ideally one who is just here through the week and returns home at the weekend.

red car in a field
We need one of these, but manage with old ones

Transportation

Ideally a financially independent life is a car-free one, but if you live in a rural area as I do this is not realistic. As I’ve mentioned before I get an allowance from my employer towards the upkeep of my car as it is essential for my job. If you do need a car, then buying second hand is the way to go, which my car was when I bought it. At nine years old it is getting on a bit and costing me more money in upkeep, but it is less than buying a new car, so I am trying to keep it going.

One possibility for us is having one car. Mr Simple wasn’t enthusiastic when I mentioned this recently, but as he is home most of the time and his car sits on the drive way, I do question whether it is really necessary. He says that he needs it when he goes away to work as travelling on public transport would limit where he is able to stay overnight. I think that it’s something we need to consider. I may look at how feasible it is for me to arrange my appointments on the days that he is usually here and to be at home when he is away so that he could take my car.

hands typing on a computer
Sell clothes on Ebay or start a blog

If you can, increase your income through side hustles

There is only so much you can do to reduce your spending unless you want to live like a monk and eat rice and beans every day. Those aggressively pursuing financial independence look to earn extra money in their spare time. You could get a second job, do surveys on line or start a blog. There are lots of ideas here on the Humble Penny website. So far I haven’t made any progress in this area.

logo for Vanguard investment platform
This is where to put your money

Put all your savings in index funds with Vanguard

All that money you save from cutting back and earn from side hustles needs to be put straight into an index fund with Vanguard. The company set up by John Bogle in 1975 seems to be the favourite of the financial independence movement, as a result of its low fees. There’s no picking individual stocks, just own a part of the total stock market, invest regularly and wait. It will go up and down, but over time will gradually increase in value until you’ve got that nest egg from which you can draw your 4%.

My money’s in a Target Retirement Fund. This is part stocks, part bonds the balance of which changes as you get nearer to the year that you have selected for your retirement. Vanguard does it all for you, so the fee it slightly higher than their other funds, but it’s still very reasonable compared to an actively managed fund.

So there we are folks, the basics of the financial independence/retire early movement and my progress so far. How’s your journey going? I would love to know. Are you just starting out or are you already retired?

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