My January review with some ideas to cut your budget

white piggy bank
Get ideas for how to cut your budget so you can save more of your pennies
Introduction

If you’re new here, this is my monthly spending review. I share my actual figures so you can compare it to your financial circumstances. Although I earn a fairly good wage I am saving about 20% of my income and putting another 20% towards overpaying our mortgage. I hope that by allowing you to see how little I am spending in some areas it will encourage you to try to cut your budget. As well as letting you know how much we are spending I also try to give you some tips as to how we do this and give you links to other posts where I explore my saving strategies in more depth.

Just to let you know this post contains affiliate links. That means that if you click on one of the links and purchase the item I will get some money. Please see here for more information about my use of affiliate links.

Our situation

Currently I am in full-time employment and have a regular income, whereas my partner, Mr Simple works for himself and only does part time hours most weeks. We have therefore decided that I will pay the mortgage and all of the monthly bills, except for food, from my account and he is responsible for the house renovations.

The payments that I show below are therefore for the full amount of the bills save for food, which is my half. We don’t split the food bill down the middle as he eats meat, which is more expensive and he drinks more alcohol.

glass of water
We are trying to reduce our water consumption
Regular bills

Every month £1550.00 goes out of my current account just after pay day into our joint account. In January that paid for the mortgage, including the overpayment, as detailed below, as well as the following:

Gas and electricity £89.78 -we are with Octopus who are a Which? recommended provider. Our payment went down last month as Octopus reduced their prices.  If you think moving to another provider would cut your budget and you may be interested in signing up with Octopus, use this link and both of us will receive £50.  

Water £40.50 – apparently one-third of household water bills are as a result of flushing the toilet. In a bid to get this bill down we are now flushing the toilet less than half the time that we used to. I am hoping that when this is reviewed in March it will go down. If you want to cut your budget in this area and don’t mind looking at each other’s wee then maybe you could try this. Here are some more ideas for how to reduce your water bill.

Council Tax £258.00 – unfortunately this is unchangeable, well, I suppose that we could move house, but we don’t want to.

Television licence £13.20 – another fixed cost unless we get rid of the TV. We don’t have Sky or use Netflix, so compared to most people this is probably a minimal cost for entertainment.

white house between trees
I am working hard so we can one day be mortgage-free
Mortgage

The balance now stands at £71,405.68 after making the standard monthly payment of £507.85 and an overpayment of £585. We have 13½ years to go on the mortgage, but if we continue to overpay at the current rate we will pay it off in just over six years, saving us £5,800 in interest. If you think that you would like to overpay your mortgage have a look at the calculator here on Money Saving Expert to see the effect of even just a small overpayment every month.  

Savings

My savings are currently £30,623.00. If you are a regular reader you will see that this has gone down by £8,000. I still have that money, but I’m no longer counting in it my savings as I am expecting to have to spend it on a new car in the not too distant future.  My Vanguard stocks and shares ISA made a grand total of £2.92. I invested £485.20.  I am aiming to save £500 per month. As you may have seen in my annual budget I have decided to spend extra money on holidays than I did last year, so my regular transfer to Vanguard is just £363.65 and then I top it up when I have a bit of spare cash if I underspend in other areas. .

The interest on my Marcus instant access account, which I am using for stoozing, was a grand total of £11.48. If you haven’t heard of stoozing, basically this is running up a debt on an interest-free credit card and putting the money you would have spent in a savings account. Unfortunately this is not as lucrative as it once was as interest rates for easy access savings accounts are low, but over £10 a month for doing nothing isn’t bad. Many websites about getting on top of your finances advise cutting up your credits cards, but if you are an organised person who doesn’t have a problem using credit cards in a controlled way this is a great option to get free money.

Half a dozen eggs in an egg box
We choose to buy eggs from a local farm, which costs more than the supermarket
General spending

Food £137.72 – very slightly under my budget of £140.00. This includes cleaning products which were £6.28. I had lunch in a café once at a cost of £7.90 and splashed out on a cheese sandwich from Sainsbury’s which came to £1.20. Every week I buy fresh fruit and veg and eggs from a local farm. Therefore about half the budget covers the monthly Tesco shop and the rest is spread throughout the month.   

I have written a couple of articles about how to cut your budget in this area. You can check them out here and here. I could get this down even further, probably by shopping at Lidl or Aldi and not buying eggs from the farm which are £1.30 for half a dozen, but I have made some choices as a result of convenience – a monthly delivery – and others on quality of the product and animal welfare.

Petrol £117.27- just coming in under the budget of £120.00. I also included a train ticket to work one day which was £9.10.  

Pilates £22.50 – we have a new teacher with a different booking system. I have in fact paid for twelve classes at a total of £90.00, which works out at £7.50 per class. With a bit of shuffling of money I have just calculated a payment for the three classes that I attended this month.

Toiletries £38.63 – £8.63 over budget. This included foot cream, body lotion, zovirax to treat the cold sore infection I get in my ear and lysine tablets to try to prevent it coming up in the first place. Next month should be a lot cheaper.  

Social £63.10 – This was £13.10 over budget, mainly due to it being Mr Simple’s birthday and I paid for a meal out. It could have been much more expensive, but I sold an old double bed for £50 and used that towards the meal, just paying the £30.00 to make it up to the eyewatering amount of £80. We went to our favourite special Indian restaurant, which we love so I don’t begrudge one single penny.

There was the usual £9 for the village cinema night which includes my ticket, a raffle ticket and some popcorn. Also, another regular social event, the monthly meet up in the village pub with neighbours, at which I bought a pint of shandy at £3.70 and a bimonthly meet up with colleagues. This has moved to a Monday night as I can no longer attend on a Tuesday due to my pilates class changing. The good thing is that the café where we go does free puddings on Monday nights. I therefore had a halloumi burger with fries and then sticky toffee pudding all for £8.00. My accompanying drink was a free glass of water. Finally, as I had some cash left over I tried myself to brunch in my favourite café when I was in the city for work and that was £11.40.

Miscellaneous £80.07 – another expensive month – £40.07 over budget. This included the Living Well Planner, which I have decided to try out and three books, including ‘Quit Like a Millionaire’ and ‘The Minimalist Home’.

scissors with orange handles
The hairdresser just cuts my hair – I dye it myself with some help from Mr Simple
Expenses from bills account – expected annual/regular expenses

Instead of having some expensive months I divide all of my one-off expenses into twelve and save towards them each month. I also save for more regular expenses such as holidays and haircuts.

Physio sessions £96.00– I only attended two sessions, but last year one of my cheques wasn’t cashed. My physio had received the money, but it wasn’t withdrawn from my account. After six months I had re-credited this amount to my calculations and then last month it was then cashed. Not sure where it’s been for all those months!

Hair cut – £16.00. I went in with it wet and just paid for a cut. The hairdresser roughly dried it off so I didn’t catch pneumonia on the way home. I used to pay over £60 every six weeks to have it cut and coloured. Now I just go six times a year for a cut and then colour it myself, with some help from Mr Simple.

Holiday deposit £75.00. We have booked a cottage for the week in Pembrokeshire in May.

Headlamp bulb £4.50  

So that’s it for January. How did your spending go last month? Would you like help to cut your budget? I’d love to hear any comments you have or if you’re looking for some ideas then please let me know.

3 Replies to “My January review with some ideas to cut your budget”

  1. It’s nice to read another update from you, Sam! You taught me something new today—stoozing. I’ve heard about this before, but didn’t know it had a name!

    Maybe it just doesn’t have a name in Canada? Whatever the case, I’ve considered stoozing before and now will look into it more earnestly!

    You’re making great progress on your mortgage paydown. Looks like you’ll get there before you know it! I hope you have a wonderful February. 🙂

  2. Wow there’s so much good stuff in this post! Thanks for sharing this. I like the water-saving toilet trick 🙂 You are kicking butt on your mortgage. Way to go! Halloumi burger and free pudding? YUM! The Living Well Planner looks interesting. Need to put Quit Like a Millionaire on my reading list.

    1. Mrs Root, good to see you. I am interested to see whether our water bill changes when we get the amount for the new direct debit from April. Fingers crossed that will be another saving made. I have to say that I do like the Living Well Planner, although wish I could find an equivalent in the UK. Have adapted it to fit my needs and is saving me time compared to my previous bullet journal. Still waiting for Quit Like a Millionaire to arrive. May even publish a review at some point. Best wishes, Sam.

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