Creating a Money Mission Statement

Tanja Hester’s great book ‘Work Optional’

If you’re like me, when you discovered FI/RE you wanted to be financially independent as soon as possible and started cutting everything that you could from your budget, maybe to the point where life became miserable. As the saying goes, it has to be more than just getting to the destination, you have to enjoy the journey along the way. How then do you make decisions about what to spend your money on and what you can do without? How do you have enough in your life to make it enjoyable, but avoid spending on things that you probably wouldn’t miss that much? The truth is this is probably going to look different for everybody.

Tanja Hester, in her book ‘Work Optional‘, suggests creating a ‘money mission statement‘. This starts with looking at your mindless spending, which may have come about as a result of lifestyle inflation. If you think back to when you were a student or when you got your first job and compare that life with your life now, how is your spending different? What do you spend money on now that previously wasn’t part of your life? Do these purchases really enhance your life or have they just become a habit?

Tanja goes on to repeat a point which is the focus of ‘Your Money or Your Life’ by Vicki Robin and Joe Dominguez. Basically, money is a reflection of the time that you spent earning it. If you get paid £20 an hour and you buy a handbag for £100, that cost you five hours of your life. If you look at purchases in this way, as a function of your time on this planet, you may think twice before you click ‘buy’ on that Amazon basket next time.

So how do you develop your money mission statement to help you decide what you are prepared to spend money on and what you are going to leave on the shelf? Tanja suggests some questions for you to consider. So here’s the questions and what my answers to them are:

My best ever investment
What is the single best thing you’ve ever spent money on?

I have struggled to choose one thing. At the moment I would say Natalie Bacon’s ‘Grow Youlife-coaching course which I joined earlier in the year. It has changed the way that I think about so many things in my life and given me the tools to really examine my thoughts and try to address the challenges that life puts in my path. Previously, I might have said my social work course, which enabled me to have a job that on the whole I really enjoy. The other things that came to mind were major holidays of which I have some great memories.

What ongoing expenditure makes you happiest?

My answer to this was again ‘Grow You’, but I would also include the online Pilates programme that I have discovered since the beginning of the lock down. Both of these are in the category of personal development. One for my body and one for my mind.

coffee magazine
I used to spend a fortune on magazines and didn’t always read them
What do you spend money on that you wouldn’t miss?

As I write, the answer to this question is honestly ‘nothing’, as I have really pared my budget down to the bone. Before I did that the answers would have been magazines, fiction books, facials, hairdressing and clothes. That’s probably why I have managed to go without these over the past 18 months and not miss them too much. On the other hand I have missed holidays, eating out with Mr Simple and friends and good food, which until the beginning of the pandemic were gradually creeping back into the budget.

What would feel like too big of a sacrifice to be worth it?

In my efforts to cut the budget to the bone I have reduced our grocery spending drastically, but I must admit this hasn’t always felt like a healthy way to live. I’ve realized that the food that is cheap is very carb-heavy, such as bread and pasta. I began to miss my avocados at breakfast. We don’t eat out as much as we used to do, but I have begun buying better quality products, such as extra virgin olive oil.

baguette baked baking bread
Even the simplest of meals out feels like a treat at the moment
Could you spend less on the things you value without missing out on the core of the experience?

I found this a hard one. We love meals out, but it’s something we only do rarely. When we do we like to splash out and go somewhere particularly nice. Doing it less often also makes it feel more of a treat. Since March the only food we’ve eaten out was a breakfast baguette and tea and cake, both at local country parks last month. Just those simple treats felt very indulgent.

We have had less expensive holidays over the past couple of years and they have still been enjoyable, but I don’t think that I would be happy if we could never repeat the experiences we had before Mr Simple got made redundant. For example, we did a cycling holiday in Tuscany with Skedaddle. A private car from the airport, bikes and directions provided and bags moved for you everyday whilst you cycled to the next hotel, enjoying the beautiful countryside and leisurely lunches. With holidays like that you’re paying to let someone else do all of the organisation and every so often I’m willing to part with my hard-earned cash for that service.

Was there a time in your life when you enjoyed your lifestyle, but spent less than you do now?

I enjoyed my twenties. After university I worked part time and volunteered a lot. I didn’t have any responsibilities. I didn’t have a mortgage, although I did live in some awful places at times, with neighbours who played loud music at 3am or where I didn’t feel completely safe walking the streets after dark. Holidays were volunteer projects where we worked five days out of seven, cooked for the group and camped. Travel to most of the destinations was by coach, often overnight. Not the most luxurious or a very comfortable way to travel. Would I want to go back to that time? No. I definitely wouldn’t want to rent a property again. I would though like to work part-time, as I did then.

Is there anything you enjoy, but are willing to give up to reach your goal?

As I said above, I have cut my budget the bone and given up lots of things. I see this as a temporary measure until we are financially stable enough to go back to splashing out a bit more on our food budget, eating out and holidays.

crop woman with coffee writing in notebook on bed
Use all of this information to create a spending philosophy
spending philosophy

Finally, combine all of this into a spending philosophy by filling in the following statements:

  • I spend mindfully and without guilt on: Pilates, Grow You, good food, food with friends and personal development books.
  • I spend only as much as necessary on: household bills and clothes
  • I do not spend money on: magazines, expensive holidays and frivolous items that I don’t need

In a nutshell, my philosophy is based on the value that I place on maintaining my physical and mental health.

So if you’re struggling to decide what to cut back and what to keep or maybe you’ve eliminated too much from your life and feel like you’re missing out how about having a go at this exercise and developing your own ‘money mission statement’?

Planning a ‘Work Optional’ Life

open book
It’s time to look at another book that I have been reading
introduction

After my posts on ‘Deep Work’ by Cal Newport, I thought that it was time to go back to a book about financial independence and early retirement. The book that I have chosen is ‘Work Optional’, by Tanja Hester. This is partly about how to financially achieve early retirement, but also a lot about shaping your life – a life that you love. There is much less focus on the author’s story than other books that I have read, which I found to be a refreshing change. Instead, it is a step-by-step guide on how to discover what makes you happy in life and work out how you can make that a reality. Tanja also gives two other options apart from total FI/RE, which are semi-retirement, where you work part-time, seasonally or in a lower stress job and a career break.

As regular readers will know, my goal is ‘partial early retirement‘ and so her suggestions fit nicely with my future life plan. Since reading the book, then re-reading it and taking some notes, I have been meaning to work through it to consider what Natalie Bacon would call my ‘future self‘. As a way of introducing you to Tanja Hester’s advice I thought that I would do this here, on ‘A Simple Life’. In that way I can share her ideas with you as well as have a think about how I can put them into practice in my life.

At the moment we all have more time at home and I think that this is a great opportunity to stop and reflect on our lives, something which I don’t think that we do often enough. We are usually on that hamster wheel, not really thinking about where we are going or even where we’d like to be going. We tread the same old path we’ve always followed and inevitably we’ll continue to get the same results, rather than mapping out a new path and starting intentionally on a road to a more fulfilling life.

house on a tropical beach
You may get bored of this after a while
define your work optional LIFE

I have heard many commentators and bloggers talk about finding a purpose in early retirement. Images of FI/RE often feature tropical beaches with the implication that you’ll be spending most of your time there when you retire. The idea of ‘escaping’ the drudgery of the 9-5 for a sandy beach may seem attractive at first, but eventually you’ll get bored and want something more fulfilling to do.

I certainly know from my own observations of my parents, who are traditionally retired, that my mother seems the happier individual of the two. She has joined many clubs and made new friends since she retired, as opposed to my father who spends much of his day watching television.

For Tanja the idea is that before focusing on the financial side, you need to work out the lifestyle part. Only then do you focus on the finances and calculate how much your ideal life is going to cost you. Once you’ve done that you will have a vision in your mind about what you’re working towards, as opposed to saving and earning just to escape your current situation.

areas to focus on

So how do you do this? Tanja suggests six different areas that you need to consider.

Four people laughing
Remember the times which made you smile
Day to day life

Think about when you are happiest. For me this is when I am outside, especially if the weather is good. It doesn’t matter if that’s in the garden, a walk along the beach or a hike in the mountains. I enjoy feeling the sun on my face and spotting the wildlife.

This area also asks you to consider your hobbies. It’s likely that you currently spend some of your free time doing things that your enjoy, but may get frustrated that work gets in the way. When your life isn’t so focused on earning money you could decide to make time for your hobbies or even take up some new ones. What would they be?

Big picture dreams

For me my dream has always been to live in France. It’s a country that I love and where I have spent many happy holidays over the years. I have been asking myself why I like France. The climate certainly plays a significant part. Being able to spend more time outside and have guaranteed sunshine is definitely a major plus point for me. That is something that cannot be guaranteed in the UK. I have been thinking of more modest ways of indulging my passion for France rather than upping sticks and leaving for the continent. So far my preference is for extended holidays in France.

Mr Simple always points out that by buying a house you limit yourself to just one area of what is a large and diverse country. For me I have always liked the idea of not having to pack to go away. Having a place where I can just turn up and everything I need is there – a whole wardrobe of clothes that I just wear in France. There’s no unpacking, no working out how to turn the cooker on or where the nearest boulangerie is because you know all that already. I can though see what he means. An alternative would be to rent a house for a month or six weeks, which if you don’t work is possible. If I am in a semi-retirement phase only two to three weeks would be doable. That would give me plenty of time to start to feel at home and get to know an area.

Whilst thinking about travel I also realised that in the winter the weather can affect my mood. We live near an airport and many retired people who live in our village take advantage of that by going away during the cold months to the Canary Islands or Cyprus. I’ve realised that I want to be one of them – to have time away, say in November and February every year in order to feel the sun on my face.

golden retriever dog
We love dogs and would have more time post-retirement to look after one
Legacy and Purpose

This is about your contribution to society. What do you want to be remembered for? Mr Simple and I have become boarders for ‘Guide Dogs for the Blind’, which means that dogs who are in training live with us for a few weeks or months. This works well if you have a job, as the dogs are taken out in the daytime to train. On a few occasions we have been asked to look after dogs who are having a break from training and this has not always been possible due to our work pattern. If we both worked less we may not have to say no in the future. There is also an option to have a puppy, which you do for a year, but I’m not sure how that would fit in with my plans for more travel. And I am sure that I would really struggle to say goodbye to the dog after he or she was part of our family for a whole year.

Self-Worth

Many of us define ourselves by our professions and once we retire this is no longer an option. Isn’t it always one of the first questions people always ask when you meet them, ‘What do you do?’, but which we know they mean, ‘What job do you do?’ I was listening to an episode of ‘The Life Coach School’ podcast about visualising your future self when the world is so uncertain due to Covid19. Brooke Castillo suggests focusing on your personal qualities such as creativity. Whatever the world throws at you these personality traits will remain. So what will make you feel good about yourself when work is no longer your main focus?

Tanja recommends thinking about what you feel best at in your work. Are there parts of your job that you could continue doing, saying in a voluntary capacity? Think transferrable skills. Think as well about what makes you feel good about yourself outside of work. My profession is social work, which involves interacting with people from all walks of life and trying to help them sort out their problems. If I didn’t work any more I am sure that I could do some volunteer work which embodies these basic principles.

Over the past few months I have developed an interest in life coaching. This has some overlap with social work, although the families that I meet through my job tend to be in quite dire situations. Those seeking life coaching usually have more middle-class backgrounds. The common factor is one of problem-solving i.e. helping people improve the quality of their lives. Without necessarily meaning to do so I have begun to use some of the principles that I have learnt from life coaching when working with families. I also find myself quoting Natalie Bacon when talking to friends or Mr Simple. How it all translates into occupying myself during semi-retirement I’m not yet sure, but it’s an area that I plan to continue to develop.

a man and a woman
Who are the important people in your life?
Central Relationships

Do you have a significant other who will be sharing your ‘Work Optional’ life with you? For me that is Mr Simple, and although I talk about working part-time and planning how that will look, he is not interested in doing this with me. He believes that action is the key, whereas I like to spend more time thinking about things before I get on to the doing part.

As well as your partner, think about other people in your life who you would like to spend more time with. Once work is not such a big part of your life you should be able to make more space for them. If they live far away maybe finally you’ll have the time to go and stay with them. I’ve mentioned this a few times before, but friendships is an area where I struggle to find like-minded individuals. I know people, but the honest truth is that many of them are acquaintances rather than friends. If any of you have suggestions about how I can work on this area I would love to hear them.

Finally within this area there is your community. I live in a lovely village and have daily contact with my neighbours. Even during this period of lockdown due to the coronavirus there are frequent Whataspp messages exchanged between our group of neighbours and everyone is supportive of each other. We don’t plan to move from here and so this will continue and maybe even become a greater part of my life when I have more time to get involved in the activities that they arrange.

Life Logistics

Think about where you want to wake up every day. For me I am happy for it to be in our current home despite wishing the sun shone here a little bit more. Our current goal is to finish renovating the house so that we can spend more time enjoying it. Do you plan to stay where you are or are you planning to travel the world once you are retired?

path through a rape field
I love being outside when the sun is shining
Conclusion

So where are we? What is my semi-retirement life going to look like? After considering each of the six areas Tanja suggests that you consider the themes that emerge across the different categories of your life. For me I think that this is the outdoors, sunshine and animals.

So now hopefully you have an idea of what is important to you and the outline of a life vision that you can work towards. You may even want to write this out or create a vision board which you can stick up or have as your screensaver. Somewhere that you will look at it every day.

Next time we’ll look at creating your money mission statement, but that’s it for now. Until next time, take care, Sam.

Financial Independence – Lessons Learnt Over the Past Year

two blue chairs on the beach
You might be able to sit here every day if you achieve financial independence

It has been over a year since I discovered the financial independence/retire early movement. I have listened to so many podcasts and read hundreds of blog posts in that time. It has helped me to become familiar with many of the principles of FI/RE and for those of you new to this concept I want to introduce you to the basic tenets. This is also an opportunity for me to look back at what I have learnt over the past year and how far I have come in my FI/RE journey.

The four percent rule

Financial independence is achieved when you have saved 25x your annual spending. For example, if you could live on £10,000 a year you only need £250,000 saved. If you prefer a less frugal ‘retirement’, say on £30,000 a year, then you will need £750,000. This is based on the premise that when you stop working for money you will be able to withdraw 4% of your savings every year to live on. Despite the regular withdrawals, at a rate of only 4%, if invested wisely, your nest egg should last until you die.

Although financial independence is amazing, I arrived late to the party, so my chances of being able to save 25x my spending are about zero. Nevertheless, the principles of FI/RE have enabled me to begin to spend my money more thoughtfully and helped me learn what is important in my life.

a takeaway coffee
Not buying one of these every day can add up

Small savings can add up

This is the easy part and something that everyone can do. Unless you’re completely new to the FI/RE movement, then you will already be familiar with the usual list of things to cut out of your life e.g. cable/satellite television, gym membership, daily lattes/lunches expensive mobile phones, bottled water.

I have stopped buying so many coffees and lunches, but also cancelled some magazine subscriptions. I have also not bought any clothes in a year, having realised that I have plenty to keep me going for a while yet.

The three big wins are making savings on housing, transportation and food

These are the three areas where we all spend the majority of our money. Over the past year I have mostly been tackling our food budget. We used to do our weekly shop in Waitrose, which is one of the most expensive supermarkets in the UK. I have to admit that the quality of some of their food is better than what I now get in Tesco, but currently the savings are worth it.

woman buying bread in a market
I have worked hard on making this stress-free

Food

As well as changing where we shop I have also devoted time to meal planning and now do that once a month, along with ordering a monthly food delivery. This is one of the areas where I realised that time is more precious than money. At the beginning of 2019 I was going to two separate supermarkets each week to maximize our savings, but after a long day at work I was exhausted and found this a challenge. I was also disappointed in the quality of the fruit and veg from Lidl and we ended up wasting food as it just went straight into the compost.

Now I choose to shop only at Tesco, which is via our delivery and then weekly top ups, mainly of perishables. The delivery also means that I am not lugging heavy bags of shopping in and out of the car e.g. beer, tins, bottles of cleaning products. I feel that I have completely taken the stress out of shopping. The delivery does come with a charge of approximately £1.50, but for me it is so worth it.

white house with blue shutters
Our house is really too big for just a couple, but we don’t want to sell it

Housing

Housing is a much more difficult area as prior to discovering financial independence we spent £435,000 on a house, albeit the mortgage was only £130,000. It now stands at £73,810.70.

I don’t want to sell the house and so the only other option is to maximise our asset. This could be through AirBnB or renting out a room. The first would be my preference, but I have realise that this may be difficult when we are hosting trainee guide dogs. We love having the dogs and wouldn’t want to give this up, but I’m not sure how the organisation would feel about this. Theoretically the strangers staying in your house could steal the dog, who is worth a lot of money due to all the training hours that has been put into him/her. This eventuality seems unlikely, but it would make me anxious. I am not sure how we are going to address this and probably need to have a chat with someone from the agency.

We are then left with the option of renting out a room on a long-term basis.  At the moment I am not sure about that. Mr Simple has talked about trying to find full-time employment, which may mean staying away from home Monday to Friday. If that does happen I may consider having lodger, ideally one who is just here through the week and returns home at the weekend.

red car in a field
We need one of these, but manage with old ones

Transportation

Ideally a financially independent life is a car-free one, but if you live in a rural area as I do this is not realistic. As I’ve mentioned before I get an allowance from my employer towards the upkeep of my car as it is essential for my job. If you do need a car, then buying second hand is the way to go, which my car was when I bought it. At nine years old it is getting on a bit and costing me more money in upkeep, but it is less than buying a new car, so I am trying to keep it going.

One possibility for us is having one car. Mr Simple wasn’t enthusiastic when I mentioned this recently, but as he is home most of the time and his car sits on the drive way, I do question whether it is really necessary. He says that he needs it when he goes away to work as travelling on public transport would limit where he is able to stay overnight. I think that it’s something we need to consider. I may look at how feasible it is for me to arrange my appointments on the days that he is usually here and to be at home when he is away so that he could take my car.

hands typing on a computer
Sell clothes on Ebay or start a blog

If you can, increase your income through side hustles

There is only so much you can do to reduce your spending unless you want to live like a monk and eat rice and beans every day. Those aggressively pursuing financial independence look to earn extra money in their spare time. You could get a second job, do surveys on line or start a blog. There are lots of ideas here on the Humble Penny website. So far I haven’t made any progress in this area.

logo for Vanguard investment platform
This is where to put your money

Put all your savings in index funds with Vanguard

All that money you save from cutting back and earn from side hustles needs to be put straight into an index fund with Vanguard. The company set up by John Bogle in 1975 seems to be the favourite of the financial independence movement, as a result of its low fees. There’s no picking individual stocks, just own a part of the total stock market, invest regularly and wait. It will go up and down, but over time will gradually increase in value until you’ve got that nest egg from which you can draw your 4%.

My money’s in a Target Retirement Fund. This is part stocks, part bonds the balance of which changes as you get nearer to the year that you have selected for your retirement. Vanguard does it all for you, so the fee it slightly higher than their other funds, but it’s still very reasonable compared to an actively managed fund.

So there we are folks, the basics of the financial independence/retire early movement and my progress so far. How’s your journey going? I would love to know. Are you just starting out or are you already retired?

Planning for Partial Early Retirement

a pile of books, sunglasses, on a beach
Could you enjoy more of this whilst working part-time in your fifties?
Is early retirement realistic?

I started this site when I discovered the financial independence/retire early movement, which has gained in popularity in the UK over the past few years. At my age the likelihood of me being able to accrue a large enough portfolio to fund my living expenses before I reach traditional retirement age isn’t truly realistic. I’ve started too late. I am unlikely to be able to save enough money to stop work completely over the next ten years.

gold number four on a blue background
If you are going to receive a pension at 60 or 65 you can withdraw more than 4% from your portfolio
variations of fi/re

Whilst listening to an episode of the Choose FI Canada podcast about the 4% rule (i.e. you need to save 25 times your annual expenses and then can draw down 4% of that every year to live on without ever running out of money) I realised that there are many types of early retirement. They talked about lots of different ways that you can achieve financial independence. If you are nearing traditional retirement age then you should consider what your pension will provide when you get there. Unlike those in their twenties and thirties your savings don’t need to last for the rest of your life. You also don’t need to ‘retire’. You could work part time or change your job to something more rewarding, but which doesn’t pay as much.

the word money on a white background
Do you know how much money your pension is going to provide you to live on?
know your pension

I am lucky enough to have a ‘defined benefit’ pension. This means that I know exactly how much money I will receive when I retire. Nowadays most pension schemes are ‘defined contribution’. You put in a set amount, but what you will receive depends on how the market performs.

Do you know what type of pension you have? In the UK you are automatically enrolled into your company pension scheme and you should get a statement every year. Dig it out and take a look at it. How much will you have to live off once you reach traditional retirement age? Is that realistic for you or will you need to have some money in savings to live off as well? It may be that you’re lucky enough that your predicted pension will provide you with a great standard of living. If so, you won’t need a lot of savings in the bank e.g.to pay for a new car or that luxury cruise.

arched stone bridge over a river
Could you use interest on your savings to pay some of your bills for a few years?
will your Savings bridge the gap?

Unlike typical FI/RE, partial early retirement allows you to use your savings to pay a part of your day to day living expenses. For example, in five years’ time I am hoping to have saved £71,000. This is nothing compared to the portfolios that those thirty-somethings need to accrue to live on, but it may be enough to pay some of my expenses so that I can work part time. If we apply the 4% ‘assumption’ i.e. draw 4% every year, that would be £2840 per year. Then divide this by 12 and we get £236. This would go quite a way to paying my half of the bills e.g. gas and electricity

Would like to reduce your working hours or move to a more rewarding job? How much money would you need to have saved to meet the shortfall between your currently salary and what you will receive once you’ve made that change? It may be that your living expenses will be less in the future. For example, you may be working hard to pay off your mortgage now, but decide once it reaches a certain level just to make the minimum monthly payment rather than overpaying.

the number seven on an orange background
Maybe you could draw down more money and reduce your nest egg over time
Could you draw down More than 4%?

The figure of 4% is chosen as it is believed that at that rate, the capital will last and still increase in value for many years to come. When you are you are approaching traditional retirement age, you don’t need to worry about this. It doesn’t matter if you reduce your savings pot a bit, as long as what you have left, along with your pension, will be enough to provide you with a comfortable life in the future.

make some extra money

Under this plan it seems very likely that I could work part time from aged 55, but ideally I would like to have paid off the mortgage by this point. If you want to reduce the daily living expenses that your savings’ interest will have to cover you will need to think about ways of earning more money. Those of us who have discovered FI/RE late in life may have certain advantages which enable us to do this. For example, one possibility is to do Airbnb or rent out a room. You can earn £7,500 a year doing this before having to pay any tax.

Are you aiming for complete financial independence or are you just hoping to work a little less in the future? I would love to know your plans for the future.

Saving Ninja Thought Experiment #6

Thought Experiments are a bi-monthly event set by Saving Ninja. Anyone can take part and you will see the others who have contributed listed at the end of this post.

Here’s the question for this month:

A different opinion is somewhat frowned upon in our clique-based society, but some of the greatest minds of all time were outliers. They weren’t scared to go against the grain and stand up for what they believed in. So, for this Thought Experiment, I’d like you to reveal yourself: What opinion do you have that most of your peers do not share?

Just not my thing.

When I was a teenager and in my early twenties I followed the crowd in respect of alcohol consumption – out on a Saturday night and spent Sunday recovering, sometimes with my head down the toilet.

But that was a phase, a period of my life that I was passing through. The trouble is that most of the people I know have been stuck in this phase for the past thirty years. The ‘group think’ is that in order to enjoy yourself you have to get very drunk when you go out, spend the next day on the sofa telling your kids that ‘mummy isn’t well’ and then laughing and joking about all the stupid things you did when you were drunk with your friends/colleagues, etc. on Monday morning.

The day after!

Sorry, I know that I sound like a grumpy old woman, but I just cannot see the attraction anymore. It’s a waste of money and a waste of a day if you have to spend 24 hours recovering. I think my colleagues are used to me bowing out of social events if they are going to involve a lot of alcohol and have no expectation that I will attend. At our annual Christmas party I will have a couple of glasses of wine and that’s it. And I’m happy with that. But people think that you can’t be having a good time if you aren’t drinking. I would say, if you need to have a drink to enjoy something, then you probably aren’t having fun.

My theory is that people struggle to challenge peer pressure to conform to the unwritten rules of society. If you want to achieve financial independence (FI) and perhaps retire early (RE) you’ve got to learn not to follow the crowd. You’ve got to be prepared to say no, be different and be proud of it. If you’re constantly worried about keeping up with the Joneses and doing things you don’t want to do for fear of upsetting others, then you’ve got a few lessons to learn before you are going to be equipped to face those challenges that you will most definitely meet along the way.

That’s what being part of the FI/RE community can help with. Reading all those blogs can give you ideas e.g. check out Radical Fire who publishes lots of great posts every week and realise that you’re not doing this on your own. There are others out there treading the same difficult path, challenging the norm and saying no to choices which don’t fit with their goals.

I would urge you to think about each of the choices that you make in life. Are you doing this because others expect it of you or is it because you truly enjoy it? Does it get you closer to where you want to be? This takes strength and faith in what you are doing, but it is achievable.

How about a picnic instead?

So next time your friends suggest a night out, how about thinking twice before accepting the invitation? Perhaps think of a cheaper alternative – a movie night at home, a dinner party where everyone brings one course or a picnic with food for sharing. You and your friends might just enjoy themselves more and won’t have the spend the next day recovering. You’ll also have saved a few pounds as well.

Other Participants

Please have a look at them all and tell them what you think:

Saving Ninja

Indeedably

Caveman @ Ditch the Cave

Mr A Way to Less

Miss A Way to Less

Merely Curious

Marc @ Finance Your Fire

Money for the Modern Girl