Why You Really Need a Budget

calculator
If you want to stop being poor you really need to start budgeting

I get fed up of reading blog posts where people say they don’t budget or they don’t need a budget. It makes me mad! You may be one of those people that finds the thought of having a budget rather boring, but it’s essential. If anyone tells you that you don’t need a budget they are lying. Not having a budget means that your bills don’t get paid on time. It also means you may have to get into debt just to be able to pay for the basics in life.

In the world of Financial Independence/Retire Early there is a focus on making it sound fun and exciting. In reality, it can be hard work. Stephen Covey said that effective people are prepared to do things that other, less effective people, aren’t. Believe me, if you want to be effective in the field of early retirement and financial independence you’ve got to put in the work. This means having a budget. To some of you will seem like common sense, but I am always amazed at how many people don’t actually have a grip on their money.

So what does a budget look like?  

How to set up a basic budget

If you want to have any chance of getting control of your finances then you need to start looking at what you are spending your money on. If you don’t know how much is in your account and you are blindly handing over your credit/debit card to buy something that you don’t really need then you are in trouble.

You could start by keeping track of your expenses over the next few months, but really you need to look at a whole year. I’d recommend pulling out your old bank statements and having a look at where your money went.

Light bulb laying on grass
If you want to keep the lights on you need to start budgeting

Predictable Expenses – monthly

Let’s start with the easy part. Look at the regular bills that you are paying each month. For me these are gas, electricity, mortgage, council tax, water, phone and broadband and TV licence. I recommend setting up a separate account to pay these out of. You can automatically transfer a set amount to that account the day after payday. With that done you won’t be at risk of having the gas cut off.

Predictable Expenses – annually

Secondly, there are some bills that you only pay once a year. For me these are:

  • Car service
  • Car tax
  • MOT
  • Vehicle recovery
  • Car insurance
  • House insurance
  • Travel insurance

I also add money for medical expenses such as opticians, dentist, my physio appointments. Finally I add money towards my holiday fund. For some of the annual bills there is the option to pay them monthly by direct debit, but often this increases the annual total.

Make a list of all your one-off annual expenses, plus anything else that you want to save towards each month. Add up how much you spend on these in a year and then divide by 12. If you are going to have a second account for your monthly expenses you can then add this amount to your post-payday transfer every month. That way, when the yearly bill comes around you’ve already got the money saved. It also prevents those expensive months, as you spread the cost over the year.

Savings

If you haven’t yet got a grip on your spending, then finding some money to put away each month may not be at the top of your list. I would hope that as you’ve gone through all of your main expenses you will have discovered where you could make some savings. Hopefully you’ll have been amazed at how much you’ve wasted on things that in retrospect you could have done without. Once you’ve worked out how much you can afford to save it’s just a matter of transferring that amount to a savings account or preferably an ISA each month.

woman doing pilates
A Pilates class – one of my weekly expenses

The remainder

What you have left is yours to spend as you see fit. I have six categories for this money. They are food, petrol, toiletries, Pilates, social and miscellaneous. As I am someone who likes budgeting I allocate a certain amount to each category, but it’s entirely up to you how you spend this. As long as you don’t go overdrawn by the end of the month then you’re doing okay.

So there we are, a simple guide to start to get a grip of your expenses. It may seem like a lot of work to start with, but once it’s in place you won’t have to worry anymore when you get to the end of the month as to whether you’ve got enough money to pay the bills.

Do you have particular problems with your budget that you are trying to tackle? Let me know in the comments section or if you’d rather keep it private send me an email via the contact form and I’ll see if I can help you.